public speaking

TheY are not standing on a lectern!

Gold, silver and bronze winners STAND on this

Gold, silver and bronze winners STAND on this

You are right, winners don't stand on a "lectern."

They stand on a "podium."

 

podium - noun 

UK  /ˈpəʊ.di.əm/ US /ˈpoʊ.di.əm/ plural podiums or podia

A raised area on which a person stands to speak to a large number of people, to conduct music, or to receive a prize in a sports competition. "Tears ran down her face as she stood on the winner's podium."

Here in the United States anyway, people are constantly using the word “podium” (what you stand on) to refer to the “lectern” (what you stand behind). The reverse, not so much. Confusing these two words erodes the richness of the language. We’re on the verge of having two words for “lectern” and none for “podium.” - Daily Writing Tips By Maeve Maddox

More from "On-The-Job Speech Training" eBook from https://www.amazon.com/Job-Speech-Training-ebook/dp/B00DPM70G2

 

Consider the audience - FIRST

If you invite an audience to an event carefully consider the message, program and production targeted to your specific audience. Wikipedia: "It's the economy, stupid" is a slight variation of the phrase "The economy, stupid" which James Carville had coined as a campaign strategist of Bill Clinton's successful 1992 presidential campaign against sitting President George H. W. Bush.

Here are a few examples how clients did not follow my recommendations.

New edition "On-The-Job Speech Training" KINDLE

"On-The-Job Speech Training"

Updated tools and experiences now in the new Kindle Edition of "On-The-Job Speech Training". Gratified for the reception of the print edition I have just released the Kindle edition. For PRIME Amazon customers, you can borrow this before you buy it.

For those who have read or been trained with my workshop, this is a handy reminder before you deliver your next public presentation.

I welcome your comments and recommendations.

http://goo.gl/etu9d