"Wake up!" How to deal with a board audience?

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Can you wake up this audience?

You can if you earn their attention.

Recently I received this question from an experienced presenter. Feel his pain.

 I thought my portion went reasonably well, but I was preceded by a presenter who took about three hours for a 25-minute workshop and sort of lulled the room into a state of boredom. I could feel him losing the room during his presentation, and I knew it wouldn’t be good news for me to follow. Sure enough, I was met with many glazed-over eyes and a real lack of participation and interactiveness. What have you seen dynamic presenters do in that situation? I’m sure for every great presenter out there, there are plenty of bad ones, and if I want to be great, I’ll need to be able to pick up my game, regardless of those before or after me.

Following a dud is worse than following a champ.

Here is my answer. Please send us your suggestions for his plight.

I have seen this all too often.

 Here are steps I have seen successful:

  • When you are introduced, be in the back of the room, speak loudly and thank the previous presenter. Make a grand entrance slapping high 5's and show energy

  • Use music to transition to your presentation. Farrell Williams' "Happy" is a good example..

  • Consider running a video of “Happy.” Here is a version with the Minions. https://youtu.be/MOWDb2TBYDg Wait a minute then begin clapping along with the music. It says "clap" on the screen but a tired audience may be reluctant.

  • At the very least, get them up in place with some activity. Don't let them leave the room. Promise them you will only take (xx) "useful" minutes and they are free to leave.

  • Be discovered in the audience, stand on a chair, and greet the crowd with your promise to be (xx) minutes with useful content

  • Anything that will completely recover the room will be unexpected and welcome.

  • One presenter recently entered the room with music and 5 twenty dollar bills. He handed them out randomly with a promise each recipient could keep the $20 if they answered a question at the end of his presentation.

  • Keep your energy up through the entire presentation, being interactive where possible, as often as possible.

  • BE RELEVANT - don't waste their time - at all. They will begin to leave for sure.

  • In many cased this challenge is worse than speaking after lunch.

Give me your thoughts on these suggestions when you can.

STOP apologizing for the AV at the beginning of your next meeting

What does every audience expect?

The following observations are from more than 20 years supporting large and small events worldwide.

Designation of Events Industry Council (EIC) Certified Meeting Planner “CMP” is no guarantee AV gets the same attention as other event details.

This issue of the #AudienceAdvocate blog is prompted by a recent MPI meeting at the home of the Miami Dolphins Hard Rock Stadium.

Unusual venues have great event opportunities. AV details are ignored just as much as the typical convention hotel or convention center.

 If the bottom of the screen must be 5'6" for everyone to see, what where they thinking? 

If the bottom of the screen must be 5'6" for everyone to see, what where they thinking? 

Every experienced meeting planner knows to pay attention to these “basics.”

  • Comfortable surroundings
  • Temperature, seating, timely schedule, easy access, close parking, clean restrooms
  • Quality food and content
  • Attention to detail with food selection and service
  • Rehearsed meeting presentations
  • Dance band or DJ and appropriate décor ·      

AV details are ignored.

  • Can every audience member see and hear?
  • Screen(s) large enough to read everything from the back of the room
  • Screens high enough (5’6” minimum) to the bottom of each screen
  • Bright projector with backup projector or spare lamp
  • Backup computer with same PowerPoint™ program loaded
  • RF (not Infared) remote control for graphics
  • No ambient light on the screen
  • Minimize ambient noise in the room – air conditioner, adjacent events
  • Blackout drapes on any daylight windows
  • Sound system tested with each speaker to insure proper volume and clarity
 Does the venue know the sun sets at the same time every day in those windows?

Does the venue know the sun sets at the same time every day in those windows?

Until AV is given the same attention as catering, AV will be a stepchild, ignored by even the most seasoned meeting planner.

Missing on every MPI meeting evaluation –

  • How would you rate the - 
    • AV
    • Lighting
    • Sound
    • Could you clearly understand all the presenters?
    • Were you able to read all content on the screens without distraction?

How do avoid apologizing for the AV at the beginning of your next meeting? Add an #AudienceAdvocate to your meeting team.

Please "share" this post with colleagues - Ray Franklin – 702-879-8177  

rfranklin@stageamerica.com 

 

“You want me to speak to a large audience?”

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Excerpt from "On-The-Job Speech Training" 

You never expected to be in this position. Your boss always does a great job at these meetings. Never in a million years did you anticipate having to stand up there as well. As a product manager or specialist with the firm, you are now charged with the responsibility to communicate your knowledge at the next meeting.

Delivering presentations to large groups was probably not on your resume, in your job description, or listed in the skills required for the job. It is now!

This is not a book on “How to Write” an effective speech, but rather, “How to Deliver” a knockout presentation with confidence.

We’ve all seen what happens when politicians, clergy, even co-workers stand before an audience and deliver a message that is interesting, informative, and welcomed by all.

We’ve also seen what happens when someone is ill-prepared and unsuccessfully delivers a message on stage.

You won’t find an “easy” answer here, but you will benefit from this book’s proven “toolbox” of successful speaking techniques. When used and practiced, these “tools” will result in great experiences as you speak in front of any audience.

"On-The-Job Speech Training" is currently available in bulk or single issues by writing to me rfranklin@stageamerica.com. Single copies $9.95, bulk (10+) 25% discount.

Book Ray Franklin, The 8-Minute Speech Coach 

Why can't we see the entire screen?

 Don't approve a meeting setup until you test sightlines from the worst seat.

Don't approve a meeting setup until you test sightlines from the worst seat.

AV101 In order to see anything in the front of your meeting room it must be at least 5 feet 4 inches above the floor.

Try it. Have someone sit in front of you in any meeting room, regardless of room size.

What can you see over the head of the friend between you and the screen in the room? NOTHING below 5'4"!

 

If this is the case how big a screen can be seen in a room with a 9' ceiling?  (Hint: 9' minus 5 feet)

If you don't use the screen top valence and place the screen at its highest, the useful screen height is only 4 feet.

That looks like a mistake in an empty room before the audience sits down, but the fact is, anything below that feet is wasted so don't expect the attendees to see material below that. I have seen 8' tall screens placed in a 9' ceiling breakout room. When asked, the hotel AV tech said, "They wanted the largest screen possible."

Now the question is how many people can read what is on a 4' high screen? Using the legibility formula (FV = 8x H) anyone further than 28' from the screen will not be able to read typical detail.

If you follow my previous posts you will see a recurring theme: ceiling height = legibility.